How the Bible became the Bible by Donald L. Odell
How the Bible became the Bible by Donald L. Odell
  • "....provides excellent historical background as well as the author's personal history, which enhances his message by providing a glimpse of how the Holy Scripture can really be used." Lee Carroll, author of "Indigo Children" and many "Kyron" books
  • "I just forwarded to friends Balboa's Introduction to your 2nd Edition. Actually Don, I really think this 2nd Edition could not be more timely. I sincerely think there are more people receptive to opening their minds about their programming of religion or the Bible than ever before...." Pat W., (North Carolina)
  • ".... a refreshing synthesis of scholarship and deep personal reflection. Don O’Dell invites us to enter the experience of biblical personalities and groups, and to feel their struggles to find elusive spiritual coherence within their perception of events...." Dr. Jim Nourse, Ph.D., psychologist, acupuncturist and author of Simple Spirituality: Finding Your Own Way, and Opening the Aloha Mind: Healing Self, Healing the World with Ho’oponopono
  • "This highly readable book takes a conversational tone when, for instance, in Chapter 6 (The Time of Jesus), the author gently transitions us from the Old to the New Testament." New Age Retailer
  • "This book is of much value to the serious student of Holy Scripture. It will enable the reader to view the Holy Scriptures in the context in which the books were written and arranged." James J. DeFrancisco, PhD. Miltha Ministries, Mishawaka, Indiana
  • "....provides excellent historical background as well as the author's personal history, which enhances his message by providing a glimpse of how the Holy Scripture can really be used." Lee Carroll, author of "Indigo Children" and many "Kyron" books

2nd Edition, Revised Material

What Does The Bible Say About Self Examination

Spiritual Journey: Lessons from the University of Creek Muck

Several years ago, while still in Tennessee, I was cleaning up the wet-weather creek that flowed from the Catoosa Wildlife Management Area through our property. I was cleaning out sticks, wild water grasses and weeds. As I would pull a clump of vegetation, the roots, all mired in creek muck, contained all sorts of bugs, beetles, and other tiny critters. Each clump of muck was its own little universe. It was a remarkable moment as I tried to imagine life in that clump of muck from the perspective of its myriad inhabitants.

I knew the muck would dry as would the water vegetation, and the critters would either die or scatter. This day the creek muck is alive as its own little world and the next it is apparently dead. What happened? What's missing? What is Life, anyway? Native Americans– and, as far as I know, many other indigenous cultures e.g., Amazonian, Alaskan Inuit, Aborigines, Polynesian – have had an intrinsic reverence for this thing called Life. Attributed to their Great Spirit, Life was Life – whether in stones, deer, themselves, frogs, birds, plants, rain, or snow. Life was a mystery and was revered. Not some of life was revered some of the time. All life all the time. There was no hierarchy in Life. Human life was not more valuable than animal or plant life. Life was Life. It was a mystery. It was honored.

Native Americans didn't consider their form of Life to be superior to another. They had no more right to be alive than a stone or a maize (corn) plant. This was not an intellectual deduction from repeated shamanic observations. This was embedded in their hunting, defending, family life, crafting, ceremonies. In short, it was their culture; it was who they were. They were at one with their world. Just a piece. Not superior. Not a user. Simply an interactive part of the whole system of Life.  They didn't see Spirit's creation as something beneath them to be used. They simply saw themselves as one part of Spirit's creation, which many viewed as a web – touch one strand and the whole web vibrated.

They were not above the environment; they were not users of the environment; they were an integral part of the environment. I was sensing this unity. This web. It wasn't rational, It was experiential. I felt very, very peaceful and content. It was a ONEderful moment.

It's difficult for me to see this unity and feel this peace if I am not living in the Now. If I am obsessing about the future [I remember an AA definition of fear: Future Events Appearing Real] or if I am reliving a positive or negative past event, then my monkey mind is concentrating on my own self-created non-events. These non-events, then, will have become my NOW, so I will not notice those miniature revelations of the unity of life embedded in a university of creek muck.

When I truly sense the reality of that web, I become immediately calm. My little spark – called biological life – is no different (nor better than) any other form of biological life. I’ll watch an ant. I don’t think he’s saying to himself: “I’m tired of this. Why couldn’t I have been born a soldier ant instead of a worker ant? Why couldn’t I have been born a butterfly – or a hummingbird?” Maybe I was a little off my rocker, but I felt calm. I felt peace. I felt at ease. And I have grown to love those small little moments. If only people could be as non-judgmental as ants. Oops! That statement means I am seeing folks as judgmental, which means I am looking at them through my own judgmental eyes. That judgment – not the web of Oneness – has become my NOW.

The following quote is from the novel, Crescent by Diana Abu-Jaber, W.W. Norton & Company, 2003: “Sirine is almost asleep as [her uncle] tells a story. ‘Not everyone knows this, but in addition to the real mountains there are purplish ghostly mountains that sleep behind them. And you should never look too closely for too long at just about anything unless you’re willing to let yourself perceive this other world, the world behind the senses, the world not of things but of immutable, unknowing being.’”

When I’m focused on the Now, I am open to the “…world not of things but of immutable, unknowing being.” I know that I’m very peaceful there. I experience the Oneness. Maybe this is the Peace that passes all understanding – the peace that comes from experiencing "the world behind the senses.” Maybe this is where we encounter and experience the Kingdom of Heaven, which is in you and all around you. (This kind of experiencing has nothing to do with intellectually comprehending dogma or creeds.)

Regardless, I find it amazing that somewhere deep in me I found a calm, a peace, a serenity from an inside-me identification with a small clump of wet-weather creek muck.

Thanks for listening and, as always, it's okay to forward this, if you choose. Please, though, forward all of it. Buy My Book Don Blog #1 – May 2020 Copyright, 2020

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"I just forwarded to friends Balboa's Introduction to your 2nd Edition. Actually Don, I really think this 2nd Edition could not be more timely. I sincerely think there are more people receptive to opening their minds about their programming of religion or the Bible than ever before. It appears it takes humans a long time to change - you timed this perfectly! Answering questions about the Bible that many have had but were afraid to ask could really help open the door wider to the changes we desperately need. So you are part of the change! Congratulations for that service to this planet…." Pat W., (North Carolina)
"This website is a great tribute to Don's spiritual work. He is the real deal. He is as authentic in person as he is in his writing. His books and his on-going message have always been very helpful to me in my spiritual journey. Don is a mentor to many, so I'm excited he is getting an opportunity to share his wisdom with more people." Barbara M. (Tennessee)
ISBN (HARD): 9781982243067
ISBN (SOFT): 9781982243081
ISBN (eBook): 978198224307